Dating your fender bass

Suddenly, electric guitars were #1 on every kids Christmas list.

Companies that had been manufacturing Accordions for 20 years, retooled for electric guitars.

Next to that is a nice Silvertone Mosrite with slider controls. Then two sweet GOYA Rangemasters and a wacky Galanti. Next is one of my current favorites, a 6-string Espana Viola shaped guitar. This guitar was also made at the VOX factory, and shares all the same parts and finish ast the 335 style Espana pictured way up above. Next, a MINT 60’s Airline Barney Kessel featuring the very cool “Kleenex Box” pickups, another current Custom Shop Reissue. This is exactly the same as the Univox, but was imported to Canada under the brand Raven.

You can see the inspiration for the Sidejack Series in many of these guitars. Then, a 9.5 Silvertone Mosrite and a VERY odd and curious guitar labeled CONTESSA.

A new serial-numbering scheme was adopted toward the end of 2009 using the number “10” as a prefix, followed by a space, followed by seven digits.

The “10” prefix was designed to identify the first year of the second decade of the new millennium, and while it appears on the instrument decals, it was not captured in Fender’s operating system.

It is hard to imagine today, but in the early 1960’s having an electric guitar in your home was rare.

dating your fender bass-79

Below: Perhaps my favorite 1960’s guitars, the Domino’s.

Below: A mint early 1960’s Airline with original case. It is owned by a friend of mine that brought it over last week to tease me! Fortunately he agreed to let me share some pictures with you.

Fender began producing instruments in its Ensenada, Mexico, factory in 1990.

I have owned many Domino Californian’s over the years (the VOX Phantom copy). Domino made one of the better quality reproduction guitars in the late sixties.

The Spartan pickguard was autographed by Edwyn Collins.

Leave a Reply